Dreams of Taos Part 1

Faithful readers, thanks for sticking with me. I know it’s been FOREVER, but I have returned to the blogosphere. I have much to catch you up on! To begin, I have to go back in time to October of 2012. My last post was September of 2012, so I suppose that’s pretty much where I left off.

SO! For my 20-something-eth birthday, my mother and I took a 9-hour road trip to the allergen-free state of New Mexico. Lucky for you, I took probably a bazillion pictures. We took the scenic route to New Mexico and stopped first in Shamrock, Texas. Population: 1,929. It’s an old oil town in the wildly uncool part of the Texas Panhandle. They are famous for their beautiful Conoco filling station, which was built sometime in the 1940s. They’ve kept it in beautiful shape:

20121019_110656 20121019_110559 20121019_110100 Our next stop, the Cadillac Ranch: This would have been cooler if it weren’t near a really nasty CAFO. Geez the smell off those things. But I have always wanted to see the Cadillac Ranch, so Mom and I parked the car and checked it out. They operate under the BYOP rule, if you want to know. It was honestly a kinda cool artsy thing. Check it out.20121019_135127

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After taking in the art deco, we continued on through the panhandle, stopping for lunch. I will say that those Texans know exactly how many fish tacos I can eat:20121019_130658

Post-fish tacos, we continued driving into the sun and crossed the border into New Mexico. Taos is surrounded by mountain ranges, and we were there at the peak of fall. The perfect time to witness mountains and foliage:

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The funny thing to me about New Mexico in the fall is all the adobe and dusty things surrounded by bright orange and gold and red leaves. I guess I always picture log cabins and fall colors, but apparently the Native Americans also have a right to foliage.

In the early evening, we arrived in Taos proper after winding through gorgeous mountain ranges and through tiny towns full of adobes. Taos is known for its skiing and hiking and other outdoor activities, but we were there primarily to take in the historic aspects, do some shopping, and enjoy the scenery.

We made plans to stay at this bed and breakfast that was just a bit south of Taos called Adobe and Pines Inn. It was rated one of the best B&Bs in Taos, and it was WAY better and more awesome than I expected. It’s part of an historic hacienda built in 1832.

20121020_153557 20121020_153547 20121020_153415 P1010246 P1010243 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA 20121020_153757 20121020_153209 Our room on the first night was called Puerta Azul, and it was the oldest room on the property as part of the original adobe hacienda! It was so cozy and perfect. It even had a chiminea (fireplace). The entrance was a very unassuming but vibrantly blue door that you had to duck into:

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But behind the door was our bed for the night:

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Even the other side of the door was blue! Isn’t it tiny?

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After settling, in we needed food, pronto. It was dark, so we were going to have to find somewhere to eat with the help of the Internet. This is always a crapshoot, but after wandering and driving around in the dark for a while, we managed to find a little shopping mall with a bar and restaurant in it. New Mexico’s grand claim to fame is green chilis. They put it on and in literally everything: salads, baked potatoes, hot dogs, burgers, stews, soups, and sandwiches. I had the hot dog with green chili, and it was extremely delicious. Those New Mexicans can roast their peppers.

After dinner, Mom and I retired to our adobe for the evening and lit ourselves a fire in the chiminea and burned a smudge stick. They had smudge sticks almost everywhere we went, and all the New Mexicans swear by them. They’re these little bundles of herbs like sage, thyme, and even cedar, and when you burn them, it’s just the most fresh and smoky scent. It’s amazing. And did I mention the pinion pine? It must be burning everywhere 24/7 because it smells incredible all the time. With our tummies full and our fire lit, we hatched a plan for what we’d do the next day…

 

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